5 Basic Tips for Monsoon Travel in India

Rainy Season
While India enjoys the reputation of being one of the most happening destinations during September through March, when the weather is cool and opportunities are plentiful, there are a few brave ones who tend to gather the guts of traveling to this country during the monsoons- not the best time to travel to India, whatsoever. And this blog is intended precisely for that daring few to update them with tips on how to survive through the harsh yet magical Indian monsoon. Here we go.

Magical Indian Monsoon

But before we proceed with the tips, there are a few things a prospective foreign traveler to India should know. In spite of the fact that Indian monsoons are a pleasure to contemplate, it comes with a price.

Girl Enjoying in Rain

We certainly do remember the delicious hot pakoras and the masala chai from a street tea-stall with the rain battering on the roof above you head, but as you go through a reality-check, the ugly side of the Indian monsoon hits you hard on your groin in the form of flood and epidemic— Landslides, water logging, flood, mosquitoes & flies are just to name a few.


Delicious Hot Pakoras & Chai

So, here is what you need to do if you are a foreigner and happen to be in India to enjoy its exquisite monsoon.

1. Be very careful of what you drink and where you drink

Drinking Water

Most tropical disease like cholera, diarrhea, dysentery, typhoid is water borne. So, what you can do here is to avoid drinking water from a source that you are not sure about. It is better to carry your own bottled water or better still, boiled water just to be sure. In the absence of both, carry water purifying tablets and dissolve them in water before drinking them. They may not taste good but will save you from falling sick. Another thing to remember is not to add ice to your drink unless it is from a trusted source. You should check if the ice has been made from filtered water. If not, avoid it.

2. Say no to cut fruits

Cut Fruits

In most of the tourist cities in India like Banaras, and Jaipur, you will find that vendors setting up their stall of cut fruits by the roadsides. While you may be tempted to taste them, it is a good idea to resist the temptation as the water used to keep the fruits fresh may not be free from contamination. You can always buy uncut fruits, wash them and eat them after cutting, but anything that has been already cut and raw should be avoided.

3. Book your tickets well in advance

Early Booking

A lot of tourists who come to India want to take things in stride and arrive without tickets booked for further journeys within India. While you should generally avoid this, it becomes more important during monsoons as a lot of trains at times are running late due to heavy rains, and you may not get last minute bookings because of the rush. Also, never buy tickets from unauthorized agents or touts as there is no guarantee those tickets will be genuine.



4. Trekking in the Himalayas

Leh-Ladakh Trekking

Most of the Himalayas during monsoons get heavy rainfall, and there are higher chances of landslides during this season as compared to other times of the year. Consequently, hundreds of tourists get stuck in the landslide prone areas (like Himachal Pradesh and Uttaranchal) during the monsoons. But if you still want to go for trekking in Himalayas, you should go to Leh in Laddakh. Leh is in the close proximity of the Nubra Valley which falls under the rain shadow area and gets very little rainfall during this period.

5. Best Places to Visit in Monsoon

Indian Monsoon Tourism

So, you still want to experience Indian monsoons? Well, if such is the case then there is no better place than Kerala, Goa or Mumbai (needless to mention, North East India) that has an abundance of monsoon magic for you. All these places are well connected to the rest of the world by air. Goa and Kerala and the North East will give you the magic of monsoon in its natural form while Mumbai will show you how a modern metropolis faces the onslaught of monsoon while the life goes on.

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